Alice at the lake, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5.
Margaret with the horses, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Alexander at the cottage, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Gerry with his fish, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Ben fixing the canoe, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Annette fishing, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Isabel on the rocks, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Ruby at the waterfalls, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Eugene at the campfire, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Theodore hunting, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Thomas in the canoe, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Rose swimming, 2012
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
Walter at the cherry blossom picnic, 2011
Inkjet print, 30x40 inch, Edition of 5
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Enter the Great Wide Open

Enter the Great Wide Open is a photo-composite series that borrows and is inspired by early 20th century photographic representation of landscape, as well as vernacular photography during this period. Being inspired by how we have learned to use the land, the series aims to explore individuals’ current and past relationships between iconic Canadian landscapes and leisure activities.

I work with photos from my family photographic archives and found photographs from the 1920s to the 1940s. To create my fictitious worlds of fabricated landscapes and moments, I work without a camera and instead I use digital tools to create my final pieces.

I have come to realize that my ancestral past and the historical visual representation of Canadian landscape is an important element in how I have shaped the way I see and use the land and ultimately perceive landscape. These leisure activities that I portray in my images; picnicking, fishing, snowshoeing, are activities and hobbies that many still practice today. Posing in a canoe or a photo taken of family and friends cross-country skiing are photographs that I can find in my grandparents photo albums, just as I can find them in my own personal photo archive. These visual references become methods to preserve oneself in time but also tend to reveal an identity that is difficult to disassociate from. The process of my work allows me to revisit and re-encounter our past within the landscape and explore past and present relationships through the camera and the land.